After 23 years the show was revived as a movie in Netflix titled Rocko’s Modern Life: Static Cling, a final chapter in the tale of “I Have No Son!” which was the last episode of the series. Directed and written by show creator Cosmo Serguson and Joe Murray, along with writers Tom Smith and Dan Becker. The 45-minute Netflix exclusive arrived with the right artistic credentials but no assurances.

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Netflix: Rocko’s Modern Life: Static Cling

The special displayed the shows’ humor and horror giving a nostalgic feeling. We’re starting in the near-earth orbit. We find Rocko the wallaby, Filburt the turtle, Heffer the steer, and Spunky Rocko’s dog has been orbiting in space for twenty-five years, powered by a missile which made a hole in Rocko’s house, only with a single VHS to amuse them, their favorite animated series The Fatheads, until the tape is destroyed. Losing their favorite TV show encourages them to go back down to Earth only to discover that they are no longer in their popular ‘ 90s O-Town.

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Netflix: Rocko’s Modern Life: Static Cling

The show includes flickering jokes about the tragic demise of the classic TV series, but also time-consuming issues like social media growth and development, constant mobile alerts, 3D-printed comics, ridiculous food products, and fizzy drinks that evolve.

So Ed Bighead, Rocko’s previous neighbor, and nemesis, that was doing great without Rocko. He loses his mind as soon as he sees Rocko again. The tempo and tone of Rocko’s criticisms of modern society in the 21st century followed those of the 1990s. Rocko’s Modern Life: Static Cling capitalism is blowing, companies like Bighead’s Conglom-O are abusing workers and strangling societies, and technocratic usage is rampant, trying to suck up Rocko and his pals.

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Netflix: Rocko’s Modern Life: Static Cling

Rocko argues that only one thing would bring back his sanity, and save the city from economic collapse. That thing was to get The Fatheads, an entirely convinced-fire hit for Conglom-O back for another season by hunting down its maker and persuading the production company to create more episodes. (Sounds like 90s kids. Our ongoing plead to revive old classic cartoons.)

The irony was that The Fatheads were developed by Rachel Bighead who is a woman we’ve come across in the shows “Wacky Delly” and “I Have No Son,” once the transgender man still hadn’t adapted and still used the name “Ralph.” This twist in Static Cling is an incredible and unexpected reflection on both the movie’s central idea of transformation, which Rocko and his friends, and then the Bigheads especially Mr. Bighead, all had to adjust to in order to live in modern society and also have a relationship with one another as family members.

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Netflix: Rocko’s Modern Life: Static Cling

In Static Cling, Mr. Bighead changes his outlook on his daughter so that the story can wrap up in less than an hour, as did Rocko who begins the film because he needs The Fatheads just to see the finished product, with its changes and modifications from the old format, and he doesn’t like it. However, everyone else likes the new Fatheads that Rachel made, leaving Rocko becoming more disheartening and detached from the 21st century than ever before.

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Netflix: Rocko’s Modern Life: Static Cling

Rocko is obviously incorrect, and it is Mr. Bighead who is calling on him to defend his daughter stating that change cannot be avoided. It is as if the producers of this movie are dragging the fan-based who are obsessed with nostalgia into the future, telling them that civilization is progressing, even without them, at catering their demands in every moment. It’s up to you whether you share in the fun or not.