South Korea is a beautiful country filled with amazing sites, beaches, temples, and scenery. Not to forget the delicious food and is home to many Kpop artists such as the global phenomena BTS. South Korea, Seoul, is the fifth most populated country in the world. There are several cultural roles which are to be followed in South Korea:

1. Alcohol Drinking Etiquette

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Koreans have strict drinking rules. The first rule is that when receiving a drink from an elder, you must hold the glass with two hands (the right hand would hold the glass and the left palm at the bottom) and you must bow your head slightly. Another thing to note down is that you cannot face the person while you are taking the sip, you have to turn your head on the other side especially if the individual is older than you. Furthermore, you cannot decline a drink from someone as it would mean that you do not want to be friends with them

2. Placing Your Chopsticks

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You must never place your chopstick upwards in a bowl of rice. Placing the chopstick upwards is mostly done during a funeral.

3. Never leave a tip

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The idea of leaving a trip is not to practice here. Mostly, because tips are not needed.

4. Do not talk on trains

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It is important to show respect to the people around you. Talking on the train is considered as disrespecting the personal space of the people around you.

5. You can shout at your waiter

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This may seem rude but in Korea, the way to get your waiter’s attention is by shouting or using the call button on the table. The reason for this is that the waiters in Korea mostly leave you alone to enjoy your meal.

6. Fights are not welcomed

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South Korea is known to be one of the safest countries in the world. It is best to just walk away because the laws mostly side Koreans.

7. No Personal Space

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Due to the increasing population, it is common to be pushed or shoved; it’s not considered to be rude.

8. Don’t use red ink

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Writing names in red ink means that you want the person to die. Only the names of the deceased are written in red on gravestones to protect them from evil spirits.

9. Receive things with two hands

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Receiving things with one hand is considered rude. You have to receive things with both of your hand to show respect.

10. Manner hands/ hover hands

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Manner hand is a sign of good manners in Korea. Manner hand is the act where the guys are seen hovering their palms over the girl’s shoulder or wait, afraid of making any bodily contact. This can also be practiced amongst people of the same gender.